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Devices, systems, and methods for in-vivo sensing and in-vivo imaging using activity extending or delay mechanisms

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034015D
Publication Date: 2005-Jan-12

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Activity extending or delay mechanisms for in-vivo sensing or in-vivo imaging. Embodiments may alter the timing of the operation of in-vivo sensing or imaging devices. An in-vivo sensing device may include a controller and/or a delay mechanism, which may delay and/or prolong the operation of the in-vivo sensing device and/or of components within the in-vivo sensing device (e.g., imager, power source, illumination source, transmitter, processor, or sensor). Such a controller or control capability may be internal or external to the in-vivo sensing device. An in-vivo sensing device may be inserted to a patient's body (e.g., by swallowing a swallowable in-vivo sensing device such as a swallowable capsule); the in-vivo sensing device may be non-operational or not fully operational upon insertion, and may become operational or fully operational after, for example, a delay such as a pre-defined delay period has elapsed. An in-vivo sensing device may become operational or fully operational upon a triggering event, e.g., reception of one or more signals, or determination that one or more pre-defined conditions were met, or the elapse of a certain amount of time. A plurality of in-vivo sensing devices may be inserted to a patient's body (e.g., by swallowing a swallowable capsule). Some or all of the in-vivo sensing devices may include a delay mechanism, or may receive external delay commands, to delay the operation of some or all of their functionalities. Additionally, a delay period may elapse between insertion of multiple in-vivo sensing devices. Consecutive sensing (e.g., imaging) within a body lumen or cavity using a plurality of in-vivo sensing devices which may be inserted consecutively; the in-vivo sensing devices may have suitable delay mechanisms to allow prolonged, improved and/or extended sensing time. Overlapped in-vivo sensing may occur, for example, where a first in-vivo sensing device is activated or starts sensing after a second (or subsequent) in-vivo sensing device, but before the second (or subsequent) in-vivo sensing device finishes sensing. More than two in-vivo sensing devices may be used, for example, consecutively, partially in parallel, with partial overlap, or in various other suitable ways.