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Method of Patterning Fine Line Features on Diamond Like Carbon Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122467D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, MJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Plasma-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD) of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) films has generated a great deal of research in the semiconductor and electronics industry due to the unique chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties of the films. Most applications use a blanket overcoat of the DLC films for passivation or abrasion protection. For large-scale features a metal mask may be used to define a pattern. PACVD processing is a relatively low temperature process in which the temperature can be varied in order to tailor the DLC film properties. In addition, the process is conformal.

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Method of Patterning Fine Line Features on Diamond Like Carbon Films

      Plasma-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD) of
Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) films has generated a great deal of
research in the semiconductor and electronics industry due to the
unique chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties of the films.
Most applications use a blanket overcoat of the DLC films for
passivation or abrasion protection.  For large-scale features a metal
mask may be used to define a pattern.  PACVD processing is a
relatively low temperature process in which the temperature can be
varied in order to tailor the DLC film properties.  In addition, the
process is conformal.

      In many applications, small feature size, on the order of a
micron or so, is important, and the ability to delineate or pattern
these dimensions rules out metal masks. Another technique that is
used is the "lift-off" process, which utilizes directional and low
pressure evaporation techniques such as E-beam evaportaion and
resistive heating evaporation.  One of the constraints on the
lift-off technique is that the mask material must be easily removed
after deposition.  To achieve this, the sidewalls of the mask
(usually an organic stencil) must not be coated with the material
during the deposition.  This is usually the case with directional
techniques which provide point sources due to the large
substrate-to-source distances.  The above constraints preclude PACVD
as well as sputtering as a method of deposition, since they are in
general, a conformal process, i.e., provide a uniform coating
everywhere including the...