Browse Prior Art Database

Improved Process for Serving Web Pages

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122870D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cohen, GA: AUTHOR [+1]

Abstract

In the past several years, the web has grown explosively and, thus, web technology has become extremely important. Some web servers now absorb over 10 million hits per day. Any technology that improves the performance of web servers will be of commercial interest.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Improved Process for Serving Web Pages

      In the past several years, the web has grown explosively and,
thus, web technology has become extremely important.  Some web
servers now absorb over 10 million hits per day.  Any technology that
improves the performance of web servers will be of commercial
interest.

      The objective of this invention is to increase the throughput
of multiprocessor web servers by increasing the total number of pages
stored in memories of the processors.  This can be accomplished by
applying techniques developed in Cooperative Cache Systems for
managing physically distributed memories as a single unit.  By
managing the distributed memories as a single resource, the memory
usage can be optimized across the memories, thus, reducing
duplicative caching, and  increasing the throughput of the web
server.

The process for serving web pages thus becomes:
  1.  get an HTTP request.
  2.  assign the request to a processor.
  3.  if the processor has the page in memory, serve it.
  4.  invoke the cooperative cache to get the page.
      a.  if the cooperative cache does not have the page,
           load it from disk.
      b.  register the page with the cooperative cache system.

      Consider an alternative:  a typical system where web requests
are sprayed to a network of workstations such that the load of the
processors is maintained approximately evenly.  (See IBM's
Net.Dispatch technology.)  In this...