Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Identifying a Mobile Peer's Relative Geographical Location

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000138252D
Original Publication Date: 2006-Aug-10
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2006-Aug-10
Document File: 6 page(s) / 324K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

Today cell phones and pocket PCs are improving processing power significantly driven by mobile gaming and device manufacturer's intention to enable new applications to boost sales for mobile devices. The emerging integration of multiple mobile communication channels into mobile end user devices (cell phones, PDAs (Personal Digital Assistant), pocket PCs …) enables new applications and services. Most state-of-the-art devices are shipped with hardware enabling mobile communication channels like GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications), UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunications System), CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access), WLAN (Wireless Local Area Network), WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access), and satellite position system receiver for GPS (Global Positioning System)/Galileo with all or a subset of them in a single device. Messenger and communication technologies like Yahoo Messenger, Microsoft messenger, Skype, and the others had been introduced in recent years. These new technologies enable users to created buddy-lists, a group of other users giving them special status to receive personal status and presence information. End users of these new technologies are extensively using these well-accepted features as additional information distribution communication channel.

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Method for Identifying a Mobile Peer's Relative Geographical Location

Idea: Bertram Geck, DE-Munich; Gregor Giel, DE-Munich; Stephan Kennedy, DE-Windach; Arnold

Monitzer, DE-Pullach/Isartal

Today cell phones and pocket PCs are improving processing power significantly driven by mobile gaming and device manufacturer's intention to enable new applications to boost sales for mobile devices. The emerging integration of multiple mobile communication channels into mobile end user devices (cell phones, PDAs (Personal Digital Assistant), pocket PCs ...) enables new applications and services. Most state-of-the-art devices are shipped with hardware enabling mobile communication channels like GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications), UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunications System), CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access), WLAN (Wireless Local Area Network), WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access), and satellite position system receiver for GPS (Global Positioning System)/Galileo with all or a subset of them in a single device.

Messenger and communication technologies like Yahoo Messenger, Microsoft messenger, Skype, and the others had been introduced in recent years. These new technologies enable users to created buddy-lists, a group of other users giving them special status to receive personal status and presence information. End users of these new technologies are extensively using these well-accepted features as additional information distribution communication channel.

The proposed idea advantageously enables the user of a state-of-the-art mobile device to receive GPS location information from another mobile device if the user is registered as user with special access rights in the buddy list of the other device and graphically represents the relative position of the other mobile device ('spotting').

The proposed idea advantageously provides a new peer-to-peer service called spotting (note: for multiple parties this service can also be relayed through a central distribution service). This service is very helpful e.g. to locate your friend at a crowded meeting point. Enabling functionality for this service:

1. The mobile device always receives position information via the GPS/Galileo satellite receiver and updates this information.

2. The mobile device obtains a list of other mobile devices with special access rights (referred here as 'buddy list')

3. Another mobile device requests GPS location from the first mobile device to graphically display the relative GPS position of the first mobile device.

4. The first mobile device advantageously authenticates the other mobile device as device with special rights (element of the buddy list, additional authorization/encryption mechanism may be implemented to protect personal location information from unauthorized access) and provides updates on most recent...