Browse Prior Art Database

Intelligent User Interfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000151994D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Sep-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2007-Apr-24
Document File: 30 page(s) / 3M

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Arens, Yigal: AUTHOR [+9]

Abstract

Yigal Arens Steven Feiner James Foley USCIISI Columbia University Georgia Institute of Technology Eduard Hovy Bonnie John Robert Neches USCIISI CMU USC/ISI Randy Pausch Herbert Schorr William Swartout University of Virginia USCIISI USCJISI September 30, 1991 ISIIRR-9 1-288 Intelligent User Interfaces Yigal Arens Steven Feiner James Foley Eduard Hovy USC/ISI Columbia University Georgia Institute of Technology USC/ISI Bonnie John Robert Neches Randy Pausch Herbert Schorr CMU USC/ISI University of Virginia USC/ISI William Swartout USC/ISI 1 Executive Summary 1.1 Introduction The intuition that the performance and acceptance of a computer system can be strongly affected by the qual- ity of its user interface has been validated in formal studies [Davidson 901. But building an interface can be a big effort: it has been estimated that up to 50% of a system's code is concerned with supporting the user interface. Research in user interfaces seeks to support a

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Intelligent User Interfaces

Yigal Arens Steven Feiner James Foley

USCIISI Columbia University Georgia Institute of

Technology

Eduard Hovy Bonnie John Robert Neches USCIISI CMU USC/ISI

  Randy Pausch Herbert Schorr William Swartout University of Virginia USCIISI USCJISI

September 30, 1991 ISIIRR-9 1-288

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Page 2 of 30

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Page 3 of 30

Intelligent User Interfaces

Yigal Arens Steven Feiner James Foley Eduard Hovy

  USC/ISI Columbia University Georgia Institute of Technology USC/ISI Bonnie John Robert Neches Randy Pausch Herbert Schorr CMU USC/ISI University of Virginia USC/ISI

William Swartout

USC/ISI

1 Executive Summary
1.1 Introduction

The intuition that the performance and acceptance of a

- computer system can be strongly affected by the qual- ity of its user interface has been validated in formal studies [Davidson 901. But building an interface can be a big effort: it has been estimated that up to 50% of a system's code is concerned with supporting the user interface. Research in user interfaces seeks to support

a

the development of user interfaces that: provide clear and efficient interaction

facilitate the user's tasks, plans and goals, present information effectively
*,make it easy to input information

--, Although user interface construction is difficult now, a number of trends indicate that the problem will be- come worse in the future. First, there is an increasing need in user interfaces for contezt sensitivity to users and the complex environment in which they function. Second, while interfacing hardware used to be limited almost exclusively to displays and keyboards, a broad range of new interfacing techniques and devices (e.g. head-mounted displays and 3D animation) is emerg- ing. Third, as the raw processing power of computers increases, users will demand more functionality from applications, which can further complicate interface is- sues.

".

 In this report, we briefly trace the history of in- terfaces technology, establishing the previous three plateaus of the technology, namely Primordial, Com- mand Language, and Window. On each plateau we describe hardware, software, and the evaluation tech- niques associated with each plateau. Finally, we present our vision of the next plateau which we call Immer- sion.

The difference between the Immersion ~lateau
of user

interface development and those that habe gone before

will l>e that user interfaces and construction tools will have much more knowledge about:
domains
tasks
users
media and presentation techniques
Thus, the next plateau will be characterized by:

User interfaces that know what they're doing

r User interface construction tools that know what they're building, and
Better techniques for modelling existing media, and the development of new media that matc...