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WOOD PRESERVING COMPOSITION FOR TREATMENT OF IN-SERVICE POLES, POSTS, PILING, CROSS-TIES AND OTHER WOODED STRUCTURES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000176007D
Publication Date: 2008-Oct-31
Document File: 12 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Jun Zhang: INVENTOR [+2]

Abstract

Provided is a remedial or supplemental wood preserving composition which provides protection for in-service utility poles, railroad cross ties, fencing posts, marine pilings, permanent wood foundation and other wooden structures. The composition comprises an insoluble copper compound, a pH-modifier, a cellulose derivative and an inorganic clay thickening agent. Also provided is a method for applying the formulation to in-service wooden structures.

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WOOD PRESERVING COMPOSITION for treatment of in-service poles, posts, piling, cross-ties and other wooded structures

ABSTRACT

Provided is a remedial or supplemental wood preserving composition which provides protection for in-service utility poles, railroad cross ties, fencing posts, marine pilings, permanent wood foundation and other wooden structures.  The composition comprises an insoluble copper compound, a pH-modifier, a cellulose derivative and an inorganic clay thickening agent.  Also provided is a method for applying the formulation to in-service wooden structures.

INTRODUCTION

This paper describes a wood preservative composition for the supplemental or remedial treatment of in-service poles, posts, piling, cross ties and other wooden structures.

BACKGROUND

Wood and/or cellulose based products exposed in an outdoor environment are biodegradable, primarily through attack by microorganisms.  As a result, they will decay, weaken in strength, and discolor.  The microorganisms causing wood deterioration include brown rots such as Postia placenta, Gloeophyllum trabeum and Coniophora puteana, white rots such as Irpex lacteus and Trametes versicolor, dry rots such as Serpula lacrymans and Meruliporia incrassata and soft rots such as Cephalosporium, Acremonium, and Chaetomium.  In addition, wood is still subject to attack by wood-inhabiting insects, such as termites, beetles, ants, bees, wasps and so on.  Wood preservatives are well known for preserving wood and extend the service life of wood products including decking boards, fence posts, utility poles, railroad ties, permanent wood foundation, and other cellulose-based materials, such as paper, plywood, particleboard, textiles, rope, etc., against organisms responsible for the deterioration of wood. 

Utility poles and railroad cross ties are wooden structures that are traditionally pressure treated with wood preservative chemicals, such as chromated copper arsenate (CCA), pentachlorophenol, copper naphthanate or creosote.  Pressure treatment with preserving chemicals can certainly prevent utility poles or railroad cross ties from fungal and termite attack and the pressure treatment can usually last for 30 to 40 years.  However, the wood preserving chemicals can only penetrate through most of the sapwood portion of the wood species and rarely penetrate the heartwood portion.  This will cause insufficient treatment and insufficient chemical absorption.  In addition, improper treating practices may also cause poor treatment and insufficient chemical loadings.  A direct consequence of the poor penetration and insufficient chemical loading is that, once the treated utility poles are placed in service, often times a small percentage of poles show premature decay and subsequent strength loss.  As a result, a supplemental or remedial treatment is neede...

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