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JOINING AND BOOKING CONFERENCE ROOMS WITH ONE BUTTON TO PUSH

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000250637D
Publication Date: 2017-Aug-11
Document File: 11 page(s) / 2M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Andrew Henderson: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Scheduled virtual meetings in a conference room can be joined by a single button press via the One Button To Push (OBTP) feature. However, if a meeting is ad-hoc or a room has not yet been booked, the OBTP is not available. The techniques described herein enable a user to join a virtual meeting and also automatically book a room with a single button press.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 49% of the total text.

Copyright 2017 Cisco Systems, Inc. 1

JOINING AND BOOKING CONFERENCE ROOMS WITH ONE BUTTON TO PUSH

AUTHORS: Andrew Henderson

Julie Lee Stewart Curry

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

Scheduled virtual meetings in a conference room can be joined by a single button

press via the One Button To Push (OBTP) feature. However, if a meeting is ad-hoc or a

room has not yet been booked, the OBTP is not available. The techniques described herein

enable a user to join a virtual meeting and also automatically book a room with a single

button press.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

One Button To Push (OBTP) enables a user to quickly join a scheduled virtual

meeting on a collaboration endpoint running collaboration software (e.g., Cisco Systems’

WebEx®, Cisco Systems’ Spark®, etc.). However, if the meeting has not been scheduled

or a room has not been booked, it can take several minutes to join the virtual meeting as

the user must also separately book the room.

For example, Andrew, who is in a virtual meeting with Stewart, sends Julie a

request to join the virtual meeting. Julie is available, but is in a different location from

Andrew and Stewart. In addition, Julie desires privacy for this virtual meeting and therefore

books a room. Conventionally, to book the room, Julie may first be required to open a

scheduling application (e.g., Microsoft Outlook®, etc.) to locate the nearest available room.

In this example, Julie must determine the length of the meeting before finally booking the

room. After following each of these steps, Julie may proceed to the room and join the

virtual meeting.

The techniques described herein remove many of the steps required for Julie to join

the virtual meeting. More specifically, these techniques automatically book a room (e.g.,

in a scheduling / room booking application) when a user joins a virtual meeting. The

Copyright 2017 Cisco Systems, Inc. 2

following description uses Spark as an example. As used herein, the term “rooms” refers

to physical meeting rooms / conference rooms / privacy rooms.

Figure 1 below illustrates a meeting invite that appears in Spark on a laptop when

the scheduled virtual meeting is due to start. As shown, Julie may click the “Join” button

to join the virtual meeting.

Figure 1

As illustrated in Figure 2 below, Julie will now see a screen where she can choose

the device (and an associated meeting room) to use for the virtual meeting. Currently, the

computer is selected for the virtual meeting.

Copyright 2017 Cisco Systems, Inc. 3

Figure 2

As illustrated in Figure 3 below, Julie may open the list, which includes both rooms

with associated devices, and personal devices (e.g., computer, desk phone, etc.).

Figure 3

The availability of rooms in the list is shown in Figure 3. For example, the room

Eileen Gray is available, the room Lady Gregory is booked by another user (via calendaring

Copyright 2017 Cisco Systems, Inc. 4

software), and another user is occupying the Spark-enabled device in the room Bram

Stroker. Julie selects...