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Capacitive Face Cushion for Smartphone-Based Virtual Reality Headsets

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000251856D
Publication Date: 2017-Dec-06

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A virtual reality (VR) headset face cushion that includes a capacitive fabric is described. The
capacitive fabric is connected to a smartphone's touchscreen placed within the VR headset. The
connection allows the smartphone to determine whether the user is wearing the headset by
detecting the difference between the capacitance when the face cushion is touching the user's face
and when it is not touching the user's face. When the smartphone detects that the user is not
wearing the headset, it can pause the VR application and/or dim the smartphone screen, which
increases battery life and improves the user's experience.
Keywords:

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Technical Disclosure Commons

Defensive Publications Series

November 22, 2017

Capacitive Face Cushion for Smartphone-Based Virtual Reality Headsets Samantha Raja

Alejandra Molina

Samuel Matson

Follow this and additional works at: http://www.tdcommons.org/dpubs_series

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. This Article is brought to you for free and open access by Technical Disclosure Commons. It has been accepted for inclusion in Defensive Publications Series by an authorized administrator of Technical Disclosure Commons.

Recommended Citation Raja, Samantha; Molina, Alejandra; and Matson, Samuel, "Capacitive Face Cushion for Smartphone-Based Virtual Reality Headsets", Technical Disclosure Commons, (November 22, 2017) http://www.tdcommons.org/dpubs_series/833

Capacitive Face Cushion for Smartphone-Based Virtual Reality Headsets

Abstract:

A virtual reality (VR) headset face cushion that includes a capacitive fabric is described. The

capacitive fabric is connected to a smartphone’s touchscreen placed within the VR headset. The

connection allows the smartphone to determine whether the user is wearing the headset by

detecting the difference between the capacitance when the face cushion is touching the user’s face

and when it is not touching the user’s face. When the smartphone detects that the user is not

wearing the headset, it can pause the VR application and/or dim the smartphone screen, which

increases battery life and improves the user’s experience.

Keywords: virtual reality, augmented reality, head-mounted display, HMD, goggles, headset,

mobile phone, smartphone, touchscreen, face, cushion, capacitive fabric, conductive fabric, power

conservation, battery life

Background:

Virtual reality (VR) environments rely on display, tracking, and VR-content systems. Through

these systems, realistic images, sounds, and sometimes other sensations simulate a user’s physical

presence in an artificial environment. Each of these three systems are illustrated below in Fig. 1.

2

Raja et al.: Capacitive Face Cushion for Smartphone-Based Virtual Reality Head

Published by Technical Disclosure Commons, 2017

Processor

Display System

Head-Mounted Display

Projection System

Monitor

Mobile-Device Display

VR-Content System

Host Server

Network

Mobile Device

VR Device

Tracking System

Image Sensors

Wide-Angle Camera

Narrow-Angle Camera

Depth Sensor

User-Facing Camera

Non-Image Sensors

Gyroscope

Magnetometer

Accelerometer

GPS Receiver

User Interfaces

Touchscreen

Keyboard

Pointing Device

Mouse

Fig. 1

VR System

The systems described in Fig. 1 may be implemented in one or more of various computing

devices that can support VR applications, such as servers, desktop computers, VR goggles,

computing spectacles, laptops, or mobile devices. These devices include a processor that can

manage, control, and coordinate operations of the display, tracking, and VR-content systems. The

devices also include memory and interfaces. These interfaces connect the m...