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Method and System for Utilizing Edible Radio Tags in Tracking and Preparation of Food and Alcohol

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000252458D
Publication Date: 2018-Jan-13
Document File: 3 page(s) / 171K

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Method and System for Utilizing Edible Radio Tags in Tracking and Preparation of Food and Alcohol

Abstract

A method and system is disclosed for utilizing edible radio tags in tracking and preparation of food and alcohol. The method and system provides traceability of food and alcohol and generates an alert to consumers regarding known food poisoning outbreaks and intoxication levels.

Description

Disclosed is a method and system for utilizing edible radio tags in tracking and preparation of food and alcohol. The method and system provides traceability of food and alcohol and generates an alert to consumers regarding known food poisoning outbreaks and intoxication levels.

In accordance with an embodiment, the method and system utilizes Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracking to track and analyze whether the food to be consumed is eatable or poisonous. To start with, food manufacturers add edible radio tags such as Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), Near-field Communication (NFC), etc., into food products and register the radio tags in FDA database with unique identification (ID) numbers. FDA database can store reports of a particular food made by multiple people.

In a scenario, when a user at a restaurant orders a meal and the meal is served to the user. The user scans the meal using a smart phone, where the smart phone is able to read ID’s from edible radio tags added in the food. Then, the scanned ID numbers are compared with ID numbers stored in the FDA database and generates an alert to the user’s smart phone regarding the quality of food. The alert displayed to the user determines whether the food to be consumed is eatable or may cause illness.

In another scenario, when the user is heating the food, the edible radio tags are made sensitive to a particular temperature range. Here, the temperature range can be set by the user such as rare, medium and well-done. Thus, when the food is heated to the particular temperature range, the edible radio tags are stopped from broadcasting a warning to the user as illustrated in Fig.1.

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FIG. 1

In accordance with another embodiment, a number of edible radio tags are added to an alcoholic beverage in proportion to alcoho...