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Persistent Photoconductivity in STO Crystals for Cryptographic Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000253194D
Publication Date: 2018-Mar-13
Document File: 2 page(s) / 206K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 71% of the total text.

Persistent Photoconductivity in STO Crystals for Cryptographic Applications

A cryptographic security device is constructed using persistent photoconductivity in thin films of

Strontium Titanium Oxide (STO). Upon detection of a tamper event, the STO circuitry is

thermally erased completely eliminating evidence of the tamper circuit.

Current security devices, such as those fabricated by IBM*, are implemented to protect against

data theft in both high-end and personal computing. These devices utilize special high-priced

security features that drive up production cost and present many processing challenges during

manufacturing. It is important though to recognize that each device must meet the U.S.

Government Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS), which are used as a means to

determine the protection offered from proposed and currently used security devices.

The goal of this invention is to use persistent photoconductivity induced in a thin (< 100 um)

layer of a STO crystal to generate electrical circuits. [1] Upon detection of a tamper event, the

STO crystal can be rapidly heated to completely erase the circuitry as well as any data stored

within the device.

Prior art addressing the issue of tamper resistant enclosures involve creating an electrical short in

the circuitry rather than an open. This concept has the advantage of completely erasing any sign

of the circuitry so that an attempt to elucidate the function of individual traces or circuitry is

thwarted.

The con...