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System and method to coordinate seemingly random light strobes with a collection of night-vision devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000256174D
Publication Date: 2018-Nov-08
Document File: 3 page(s) / 122K

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The IP.com Prior Art Database

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System and method to coordinate seemingly random light strobes with a collection of night-vision devices Consider a situation that presents two opposing groups: Group A and Group B. Group A is using night-vision equipment and needs to achieve a strategic advantage by temporarily blinding the adversary, Group B, by disabling Group B’s night-vision equipment without affecting the vision of Group A. Existing night-vision systems work independently; if a light source is introduced by one member of Group A who closes their eyes while a light source is deployed, that member blinds all other Group A members and the adversary. There is the need for a network-enabled, anti-blinding capability for night vision for a group of individuals. One existing system for Jamming laser signals intended to defeat night vision includes the steps of detecting laser pulses from a jamming laser source and producing respective electrical pulses in response thereto, and gating off the gated image intensifier device in synchronism with the electrical pulses in order to thereby prevent the laser pulses from affecting the intensified image of the scene displayed by the display. That system focuses on a night-vision system detecting laser pulses from an adversary and producing electrical pulses in order to prevent the night-vision system from being obstructed. The novel contribution is a system and method to coordinate seemingly random light strobes with a collection of night vision devices. The system presented here focuses on a blinding light pulse source that affects an adversary with and without night-vision systems while synchronizing non-blinding light pulses with the group of individuals deploying the light source and the associated night-vision systems. When Group A is using a night-vision system and individual B or Group B is or is not using a night vision system, the described system allows Group A to effectively blind individual/Group B through the coordinated deployment of a significant amount of pulsing light, while simultaneously protecting the vision of Group A. This is accomplished through a private formulated light pulse sequence and shared via wireless communication between one or more light emitting devices and the night-vision system worn by group A. The core novelty comprises two methods...